Upper Iowa University

Upper Iowa University

Department of STEM

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We offer the following majors: Mathematics, Information Technology, Management Information Systems, Actuarial Science.

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IT is an exciting field of computers, technology, and problem solving!

What is IT?

IT refers to the preparation of students to meet the computer technology needs of business, government, health care, schools, and other kinds of organizations. IT professionals select and integrate hardware and software products with organizational needs and infrastructure. They install, customize and maintain those applications, thereby providing a secure and effective environment that supports the activities of the organization’s computer users. There are important hardware and software systems concerns such as reliability, security, usability, and effectiveness and efficiency for their intended purpose; all of these concerns are vital. These topics are difficult and intellectually demanding.

Why IT?

Information Technology is the newest and most rapidly growing recognized computing discipline. It is an exciting, interesting, fast moving, well-paid, and rewarding career choice. Information Technology encompasses all aspects of computing technology, and as an academic discipline, focuses on the needs of users within an organizational and societal context through the selection, creation, application, integration, and administration of computing technologies.

Computing has the power to change the world and make it a better place. Computing has enabled scientific innovations such as robotics, communications, genetics, scientific modeling, medicine, and weather simulations. The internet has revolutionized how we communicate, experience education, and share information.

IT professionals have meaningful and flexible careers. As an IT professional, you will work on creative teams to develop cutting-edge products and solutions that save lives, help people, solve health issues, improve the environment, and strengthen interpersonal communication. Telecommuting gives you more options for combining a personal and professional life.

The world needs IT professionals. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, computer-related design and services jobs will grow 38% from 2006-16. An estimated 1.6 million IT professionals will be needed by 2016. With societal changes in IT hiring practices, fewer college-prepared professionals, and the retirement of Baby Boomers IT will continue to grow, and the field is especially open for well-prepared women and minority professionals.

IT professionals recoup their college investment. Computer science graduates earn 13% more than the average college graduate, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. According to a January 2006 article on CNN.com, salaries for computing professionals are rising quickly; and computer-related jobs are among the “top 10” with the fastest growing salaries, according to the Association of Computing Machinery.

At Upper Iowa University, the bachelor’s of science degree in Information Technology is designed to prepare students with the skills and knowledge to accept professional managerial and administrative positions in the field. The IT program features small class sizes, work-study programs, an accelerated term system, and a deep concern for student success.

Skills you'll master

  • Problem-solving ability, recognizing levels of abstraction in software, hardware systems, and multimedia
  • Practical skills such as building and using database management systems and other sophisticated software tools
  • Programming
  • Using existing software libraries to carry out a variety of computing tasks, such as creating a user interface
  • Being aware of the uses to which computers are put, recognizing issues to do with security, safety, etc.
  • Looking at innovative ways of using computers, creating tools, providing tools support, etc.
  • Communicating in writing, giving effective presentations and product demonstrations, and being a good negotiator (both in traditional environments and electronically)
  • Preparing for a job search; this involves building an impressive curriculum vitae and basing this confidently on technical and other skills
  • Being an effective team member
  • Understanding the special requirements of a globally distributed project with participants from multiple cultures
  • Recognizing the challenges and opportunities of keeping skills up-to-date and understand how to do so
  • Literacy/fluency in computing; organizing all your professional information effectively

Minor in Information Technology

The Information Technology minor program is designed to provide computer related education for students majoring in other disciplines, but interested in the Information Technology field and computing well beyond a general education level. The development of the Information Technology minor emphasizes the value of broadening skills and experience over and above the boundaries of a single discipline with computer related education.

The pervasive nature and profound impact of the computing and information technology in today’s information age create many opportunities for cross disciplinary education. Cross-disciplinary programs have resulted in significant advancements such as Bioinformatics and Computational Science. We believe that numerous future advancements will be discovered in cross-discipline areas. Students well versed in computing will be better prepared to develop solutions utilizing computing, perform research, and in some cases satisfy minimum requirements for entry into computational intensive scientific fields.

Our goals

We provide excellence in computer-related education, inspire professionalism, and develop graduates that will be successful in the managerial and administrative positions in information technology.

  • Provide quality state-of-the-art education to our students
  • Develop and expand the Information Technology program and computer education in general at Upper Iowa University
  • Actively seek to encourage women and underrepresented groups to enter the program
  • Hire and retain industry experienced high quality results oriented faculty
  • Maintain alignment with the ACM/IEEE curricula
  • Develop connections to business, education, and governmental organizations to enhance employment opportunities for our graduates
  • Develop IT scholarship programs
  • Network with UIU alumni for support

The UIU Information Technology major requires successful completion of 60 credits. UIU students also may complete at IT minor by successfully completing 22-23 credits from available IT coursework.

Program map

IT Major Plan

IT required courses (45 credit hours)

  • CS101 (Introduction to Information Technology) (3)
  • CS120 (IT Infrastructure) (4)
  • CS130 (IS Foundations) (3)
  • CS140 (Introduction to Programming) (4)
  • CS205 (Computer Architecture0 (4)
  • CS210 (Operating Systems) (4)
  • IT310 (Networking) (4)
  • IT320 (Web Systems and System Integration) (4)
  • CS330 (Databases) (3)
  • CS340 (Human Computer Interaction) (3)
  • CS400 (Project Management and Integration) (4)
  • IT410 (Information and System Security) (3)
  • CS480 (Senior Capstone I) (1)
  • CS481 (Senior Capstone II) (1)

IT elective courses (6 credit hours)

Network Administration Emphasis

  • IT348 (Advanced Computer Networks) (3)
  • IT370 (Network Management) (3)

Cyber Security and Computer Forensics Emphasis

  • IT360 (Computer Forensics and Incident Response) (3)
  • IT420 (Security Systems) (3)

Scientific Programming

  • CS150 (Programming for the Sciences) (3)

Game Development

  • SE256 (Game Design and Programming) (4)

Math required courses (9 credit hours)

  • MATH111 (Pre-Calculus) (3)
  • MATH125 (Rational Problem Solving with Real Systems) (3)
  • MATH220 (Elementary Statistics) (3)

Tentative course rotation

2013-2016
2013-20142014-20152015-2016
Fall I
IT101 (Introduction to IT)
IT310 (Networks)
IT420 (Security Cyber Systems)
CS101 (Introduction to Technology)
IT310 (Networks)
CS101 (Introduction to Technology)
CS205 (Computer Architecture)
Fall II
IT101 (Introduction to IT)
IT130 (Introduction to Programming)
IT340 (Human-Computer Interaction)
IT400 (IT Systems Integration)
IT480 (IT Capstone I)
CS101 (Introduction to Technology)
CS120 (IT Infrastructure)
IT370 (Network Management)
CS101 (Introduction to Technology)
CS120 (IT Infrastructure)
CS210 (Operating Systems)
CS340 (Human-Computer Interaction)
CS400 (IT Systems Integration)
CS480 (IT Capstone I)
Spring I
IT101 (Introduction to IT)
IT205 (Computer Architecture)
IT348 (Advanced Networking)
IT410 (Information Assurance and Security)
CS101 (Introduction to Technology)
CS130 (IS Foundations)
CS101 (Introduction to Technology)
CS130 (IS Foundations)
IT360 (Computer Forensics)
IT410 (Information Assurance and Security)
Spring II
IT101 (Introduction to IT)
IT210 (Operating Systems)
IT320 (Web Systems)
IT330 (Databases)
IT481 (IT Capstone II)
CS101 (Introduction to Technology)
CS140 (Introduction to Programming)
IT320 (Web Systems)
CS330 (Databases and Information Management)
IT101 (Introduction to IT)
CS140 (Introduction to Programming)
IT320 (Web Systems)
IT330 (Databases)
IT481 (IT Capstone II)

Bachelor of Science in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Major in Mathematics

Why mathematics?

The program in mathematics includes taking courses in calculus and upper divisional courses. Courses to choose from include Differential Equations, Linear Algebra, Mathematical Statistics, Financial Mathematics, Discrete Mathematics, Geometry, Numerical Analysis, and Abstract Algebra. Majors also complete and present a project on a topic of their choice during their senior year.

This is the traditional degree program which offers training suitable for students planning to work in mathematics and computation for industry or government, or to continue their studies in graduate school.

Majors normally spend the first two years obtaining a grounding in calculus and differential equations. At the junior and senior levels the department offers more than 25 undergraduate courses, including an introduction to combinatorics, abstract algebra, partial differential equations, complex variables, and mathematics of fractals. In addition, there are other courses at the graduate level which are open to qualified undergraduates.

Offerings in mathematics are designed to provide an understanding of the discipline at various levels, ranging from the general to those leading to graduate study. This variety of courses enables students to prepare themselves for careers in teaching and/or industry. After completing the calculus sequence, students can take courses in linear algebra, differential equations, statistics, discrete mathematics, geometry, numerical analysis, abstract algebra, and financial mathematics.

Major outcomes

  1. Students will be able to apply the fundamental facts and concepts in mathematics.
  2. Students will be able to analyze quantitative information.
  3. Students will be able to problem solve.
  4. Students will be able to justify mathematical understanding and processes.
  5. Students will have developed effective and responsible personal qualities.
  6. Students will have developed effective and responsible interpersonal behaviors.
  7. Students will utilize their integrated acquired mathematical knowledge, abilities and qualities in their professional and personal lives in an effective and responsible manner.

Minor in mathematics

The minor in mathematics requires completion of 21 credits of approved mathematics courses, 15 of which can be achieved at the calculus level and below.

Sample schedule

Sample only, different upper-level courses could be selected in different terms.

Enter in Fall of odd year
 Fall IFall IISpring ISpring II
Year 1Math 111
Precalculus
Math 120
Calculus I
Math 200
Calculus II
Math 210
Calculus III
Year 2Math 215
Calculus IV
Math 310
Intro to Adv Math
Math 302
Mathematical Statistics I
AND/OR
Math 305
Discrete Math
Math 303
Mathematical Statistics II
AND/OR
Math 342
Numerical Analysis
Year 3Math 333
Concepts of Geometry
  Math 300
Differential Equations
Year 4 Math 301
Linear Algebra
  
Enter in Fall of even year
 Fall IFall IISpring ISpring II
Year 1Math 111
Precalculus
Math 120
Calculus I
Math 200
Calculus II
Math 210
Calculus III
Year 2Math 215
Calculus IV
Math 310
Intro to Adv Math
 Math 300
Differential Equations
Year 3 Math 301
Linear Algebra
Math 302
Mathematical Statistics I
AND/OR
Math 305
Discrete Math
Math 303
Mathematical Statistics II
AND/OR
Math 342
Numerical Analysis
Year 4Math 333
Concepts of Geometry
   

Actuarial Science

What is actuarial science?

Actuarial science is a discipline used in the insurance and finance fields that applies mathematical and statistical methods to asses risk in order to decrease the likelihood that undesired events will occur. This is done by actuaries, professionals who are thoroughly educated and experienced in actuarial science and who have passed rigorous professional exams.

Why actuarial science?

  • Actuary is consistently ranked as a top-5 job by U.S. World News and Reports and other publications.
  • Actuaries are well paid, with experienced actuaries earning $150,000-$200,000 or more per year.
  • Actuaries enjoy job security.
  • Actuaries are able to find work in every part of the U.S as well as abroad.

Sample schedule

Sample only, different upper-level courses could be selected in different terms.

Enter in Fall of odd year
 Fall IFall IISpring ISpring II
Year 1Math 111
Precalculus
Math 120
Calculus I
Math 200
Calculus II
Math 210
Calculus III
Year 2Math 215
Calculus IV
Math 310
Intro to Adv Math
Math 302
Mathematical Statistics I
Math 303
Mathematical Statistics II
Year 3  Math 391
Financial Mathematics I
Math 392
Financial Mathematics II
Year 4 Math 301
Linear Algebra
  
Enter in Fall of even year
 Fall IFall IISpring ISpring II
Year 1Math 111
Precalculus
Math 120
Calculus I
Math 200
Calculus II
Math 210
Calculus III
Year 2Math 215
Calculus IV
Math 310
Intro to Adv Math
Math 391
Financial Mathematics I
Math 392
Financial Mathematics II
Year 3 Math 301
Linear Algebra
Math 302
Mathematical Statistics I
Math 303
Mathematical Statistics II
Year 4    

Bachelor of Science in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Major in Information Systems

What is IS?

IS is concerned with the information that computer systems can provide to aid a company, non-profit or governmental organization in defining and achieving its goals. It is also concerned with the processes that an enterprise can implement using information technology.

What do IS majors do?

IS professionals must understand both technical and organizational factors, and must be able to help an organization determine how information and technology-enabled business processes can improve organizational performance. They serve as a bridge between the technical and management communities within an organization.

Related disciplines

A majority of IS programs are located in business schools; however, they may have different names such as management information systems.

Bachelor of Science in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Minor in Software Engineering

What is Software Engineering?

Software engineering is the application of a systematic, disciplined, quantifiable approach to the development, operation, and maintenance of software. This discipline is the field of computer science that mainly deals with the building of software systems that are very large and so complex that they are built by teams of engineers. These systems exist in multiple versions and are in service for many years, and during their lifetime, they usually undergo many changes, to fix defects, to enhance existing features, to add new features, to remove old features, or to be adapted to run in a new environment.

In short we can define software engineering as "the application of engineering to software" or “multi-person construction of multi-version software. This definition captures the essence of software engineering and highlights the differences between programming and software engineering. A programmer writes a complete program, while a software engineer writes a software component that will be combined with components written by other software engineers to build a system. The component written by one software engineer may be modified by other software engineers; it may be used by others to build different versions of the system long after the original engineer had left the project.

Programming and Software Engineering

Programming is primarily a personal activity, while software engineering is essentially a team activity. The term "software engineering" was invented in the late 1960s after the realization that all the lessons learned about how to program well were not helping to build better software systems. While the field of programming had made tremendous progress – through the systematic study of algorithms and data structures and the invention of "structured programming" – there were still major difficulties in building large software systems.

The techniques that were used by a physicist to write a program to calculate the solution to a differential equation for an experiment were not adequate for a programmer working on a team that was trying to build an operating system or even an inventory-tracking system. What was needed in these complex cases was a classic engineering approach: Define clearly the program to be solved and then use and develop standard tools and techniques for solving it.

Who are Software Engineers?

The typical software engineer relies much more on experience and judgment rather than mathematical techniques. While experience and judgment are necessary, formal analysis tools and certain principles are also essential in practice of engineering. Such principles are much more important that any particular notation or methodology for building software, which enable the software engineer to evaluate different methodologies and apply them when they are appropriate.

Software Engineering and other computing disciplines

IT vs IS vs SE